Search Me O God. By Gilbert Growcott
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All Nations
As A Young Man
Be Not Faithless
Be Swift
Be Ye Holy
Behold
Being Fruitful
Beware Lest
Burning Fire
But In Understanding
Buy
Christ Our Passover
Cleanseth
Comparing Themselves
Desire Milk
Do Good
Do Not Keep
Draw Nigh
Everlasting
Every Spirit
First Last
Follow Right
Fullness
Give None
God Is Love
Godliness
Grace
Grow Up
Guide
Heart
Helper
Him Only
Hold
Humble Yourselves
Humble Yourselves There
I Rejoice
I Will Offer
Keep Covenant
Lay Up For Yourselves
Lead
Let Thy Light
Let Us Not Judge
Let Your Joy
Life
Life Eternal
Love And Trib
Love Enemies
Love Is Of God
Love The Lord
Man Soweth
Marriage
My Heart
My Soul
My Soul Thirsteth
Ourselves Also
Paths
Pleasure
Proud
Put Not Trust
Renewed In Spirit
Sacrifices
Salvation
Seven
Soul
Strange Doctrines
The Desire
The Flesh Deceitful
The Flesh Lusteth
The Zeal
Therefore Choose Life
They Shall Prosper
They That Seek
This Is The Way
Thoughts
Thy Word
To Tell
Transformed
Tribulation
Truth
Try Me
Uncorruptness
Walk Worthy
Who
Whole Heart
Wisdom
Without Excuse
Wonderful
Work Out
Workman
Yahweh Strength

Humble Yourselves Therefore Under The Mighty Hand of God (1 Peter 5:6)

Be humble, and then God will not need to humble you. Having to be humbled is very unpleasant (though wholesome). With wisdom, it can largely be avoided, by getting there first voluntarily. Of course, if you are not God's, He may not bother to humble you, He may just let you run out your animal course in your pride. But if you are His, humbling must come, one way or the other. Christ was humble -- "Learn of me, for I am meek and lowly in heart." He towered infinitely above everyone on earth. How then could he be sincerely humble? Because he realized that he was nothing, and God was everything. He did not (like so many) compare himself with those around him, but with God. He knew that all he ever did or was or understood was of God: the gift of God, the love of God. He had no illusions of his own innate strength or goodness or wisdom. He emptied himself -- his own natural, fleshly self -- and filled himself totally with God: or, rather, he submitted to God totally filling him, to perfectly direct every thought, word and deed. He was the perfect vessel for the Divine use. Let us try to follow him. A word of caution: we are not to sit supinely waiting for this to happen to us -- and then assume our own fleshly thoughts are God's. We are expected to strain to the limit to prepare ourselves for divine use by study of the Word and meditation and prayer and constant self-searching. We can be sure that that is the wise and scriptural course that Christ followed. Psa. 119, and others, tells us that

The Berean Christadelphians